Sampling Column

What is the meaning of analysing any sample if it cannot be documented to be representative? The answer is “none”, and that is the reason for this column. Starting with the Theory of Sampling, it will build into a valuable resource covering the theory and practice of representative sampling.

The Sampling Column is edited by:

Kim-EsbensenKim H. Esbensen
originally trained as a geologist/geochemist, but it was 30 years before he actually worked in a geoscience institution (The Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland). In-between he established two research groups dealing with PAT and chemometrics. He found a third love, scientifically speaking, some 15 years ago, when he met the Theory of Sampling (TOS), and the field of representative sampling has occupied his career ever since. Kim is specifically interested in the interaction between process—and material heterogeneity, representative sampling and augmented measurement uncertainty.

Claas-WagnerClaas Wagner
Originally trained as an economist, Claas Wagner realised that his real interests were with environmental and energy related topics and therefore continued his education in this direction. Sustainable resource management, emission reduction procedures and energy efficiency issues have all one common ground: decisions need to be based on valid data. This led to Claas’ PhD on representative sampling and data analysis for quality monitoring in large-scale combustion plants. Currently Claas combines his fields of interest, working as a consultant for various industries providing quality assurance approaches. Throughout all of this reigns representative sampling. 

Sampling quality assessment: the replication experiment

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In the Sampling Column, Kim Esbensen and Claas Wagner continue our education about representative sampling. In “Sampling quality assessment: the replication experiment”, they provide an overview of the issue of replication, which may not be as straightforward as might be expected at first.

Read more: Sampling quality assessment: the replication experiment

 

Composite sampling II: lot dimensionality transformation

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Kim Esbensen and Claas Wagner’s Sampling Column also addresses issues around ensuring valid results, from the sampling perspective. “Composite sampling II: lot dimensionality transformation” continues to address the problem of heterogeneity and how to overcome it. If you can find a time when your bulk (3D) sample becomes a 1D sample, the job is possible. Interesting examples from unloading a grain ship to emptying a fishing boat hold are described.

Read more: Composite sampling II: lot dimensionality transformation

 

Composite sampling I: the Fundamental Sampling Principle

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Kim Esbensen and Claas Wagner tackle the problem of heterogeneity in sampling and show how it can be dealt with at the primary sampling stage by “Composite sampling I: the Fundamental Sampling Principle”. As well as explaining the theory they also introduce practical solutions. Kim Esbensen and Claas Wagner tackle the problem of heterogeneity in sampling and show how it can be dealt with at the primary sampling stage by “Composite sampling I: the Fundamental Sampling Principle”. As well as explaining the theory they also introduce practical solutions.

Read more: Composite sampling I: the Fundamental Sampling Principle

   

Sampling—is not gambling! (exit grab sampling)

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Kim Esbensen and Claas Wagner have gold on their minds. However, only to explain that “Sampling—is not gambling!”: the American “Gold Rush” of the late 19th Century is a good metaphor for the unrepresentative nature of grab sampling: something that you will soon realise is to be avoided in any sampling regime.

Read more: Sampling—is not gambling! (exit grab sampling)

 

Heterogeneity—the root of all evil (part 2)

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Kim Esbensen and Claas Wagner continue their study of “Heterogeneity—the root of all evil” in the Sampling Column. We would be most interested to hear readers’ views on our new column. Representative sampling is essential for most analyses to be relevant, and the column will move from its early theoretical introduction to practical solutions. Readers interested in learning more about the Theory of Sampling may be interested in the Proceedings of the 7th World Conference on Sampling and Blending which are now freely available at http://www.impublications.com/wcsb7.

Read more: Heterogeneity—the root of all evil (part 2)

   

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